Title List Changes

Outside U.S. and Canada

Customer Center

  • support.gale.com
  • Gale Community
  • Join us on   Join Us on Twitter  Join Us on Facebook    Join Us on YouTube
  • Product Training
  • E-newsletters

Product Center

Sample Searches

The Shakespeare Collection Sample Searches

The Shakespeare Collection is a database for scholarly research that offers enriched functionality and entirely new possibilities for the study of Shakespeare and his works. This online resource brings together general reference data, full-text scholarly periodicals, reprinted criticism, primary source material and the full-text annotated works from The Arden Shakespeare, the world's most recognized scholarly edition.

Search 1:

In what Shakespeare play was the phrase "The fault … is not in our stars, but in ourselves" uttered?

Solution:

  1. Open The Shakespeare Collection and go to the basic search page. Limit to articles with full text.
  2. Enter in the search box in quotes “not in our stars.”
  3. Select the "Full Text" radio button and click on the search button.
  4. A citation displays for the Arden text of Julius Caesar. Select the link under the citation to “First relevant scene.” Act 1, scene 2 displays. Scroll down to the highlighted text: “The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, / But in ourselves, that we are underlings.” (1.2.139-40)
  5. Select the notes link for line 135 to the right of the text and view the editor’s note on this statement and its relationship to a major theme in the play.
  6. Scroll back to the top and select first the Magazines and Journals tab, then the Book Articles tab. Eight full-text articles are retrieved that discuss this phrase in the context of Julius Caesar and other plays with related themes.
  7. Select the Reference tab. Two related full-text articles display.

Search 2:

A student is writing a paper on Macbeth and the role of the witches and witchcraft in the play. She needs more information on beliefs about witchcraft in Shakespeare’s time.

Solution:

  1. Open The Shakespeare Collection and go to the basic search page.
  2. Enter in the search box witch* select the "Keyword" radio button. Limit the search to articles with full text.
  3. In the Texts—Historical tab, note in particular the first two items, which are late 16 th-century treatises on the supernatural.
  4. View 145 full-text articles under the Magazines & Journals tab and 13 under the Book Articles tab that present a sampling of how the concept of witchcraft has been used in literature from Shakespeare’s time to the present. (To limit results in this tab to articles that discuss witchcraft only in reference to Shakespeare’s work, return to Basic Search and do a keyword search on witch* and Shakespeare.)
  5. Under the Reference tab, view 12 related biographies and topic overviews, including articles on “Midwives and Healers,” “Science, Magic, and Folklore,” and “Witchcraft.”
  6. Under the Multimedia tab, view 30 related illustrations and photographs.

Search 3:

Attend a live performance of Merchant of Venice for a class assignment and compare the performance to one or two performances of the same play from the Victorian or Edwardian periods (1819-1910).

Solution:

  1. Open The Shakespeare Collection and go to the basic search page.
  2. Enter "Merchant of Venice," select the "Keyword" radio button, and search.
  3. Under the Primary Sources tab, view 16 prompt books and Gordon Crosse Theatrical Diary entries documenting performances of the play during the period.
  4. Open the Magazines & Journals tab and re-sort by Date Ascending. Eight citations to pertinent reviews or articles from the time period are retrieved. Two are full text; the others support OpenURL links that will point students to the full text reprinted in volumes of Shakespearean Criticism.
  5. Additional relevant materials display in the Book Articles, Reference, and Multimedia tabs.

Search 4:

Compare the first known editions of Hamlet (1603 & 1604 Quartos) and the modern, Arden edition of the play.

Solution:

  1. Open The Shakespeare Collection and go to the basic search page.
  2. Enter "Hamlet", select the "Keyword" radio button, and click on the search button.
  3. Under the Arden tab, mark the Arden edition of Hamlet.
  4. Under the Historical tab, mark the second and third items (Quarto 1 and Quarto 2).
  5. Open Quarto 1 and click on the "Compare Documents" link.
  6. Scroll around in the left window to get a good view of the play.
  7. In the right window, open the Arden edition of the play.
  8. Scroll and compare the two versions
  9. In the Arden edition, select "View Notes" for more information about the scene.
  10. In the top right corner of the right screen, select "Compare Another".
  11. Open the 1604-1605 edition of the play.
  12. Page forward to get to the start of the play.

Search 5:

How can one find recent full-text theater reviews of The Taming of the Shrew?

Solution:

  1. Open The Shakespeare Collection and go to the advanced search page.
  2. Select "Subject" and enter "taming of the shrew" in the first entry box.
  3. Select "Full text" and enter theater review in the second entry box.
  4. Limit to documents with full-text.
  5. Click on the search button to retrieve 36 relevant theater review articles.
Contact   |   Careers Cengage Learning     —     Higher Education | School | Professional | Library & Research | Global
Copyright Notices | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement | Accessibility | Report Piracy