General Reference InfoTrac Products

FAQs

Questions - Click on question below to go to the answer

  1. What is meant by "full-text" coverage?
  2. How do you select the journals that you abstract and index for your products?
  3. How many peer reviewed titles (refereed titles) are in your databases? What do you mean by "refereed?"
  4. How often do you update InfoTrac databases?
  5. Is there a list of journals organized by subject?
  6. Describe your indexing methods.
  7. Describe the depth of article coverage.
  8. Tell me about your controlled vocabulary.
  9. What are title annotations
  10. How long does it take an article to appear online?
  11. Where can I find titles lists?
  12. Please send me a list of everything you have added to your database recently.
  13. How can I tell when you have lost rights? Will you inform me?

Answers to Questions above 

Question 1
What is meant by "full-text" coverage?

We have adapted a statement from "Full text Sources Online" whose introductory matter discusses "full text" as applied to individual articles, "full text" as applied to entire publications and "selected full text coverage."

"Thomson Gale full text coverage means that the text of each article is provided in its most complete form. The content included consists of all feature articles, reviews, editorials, letters to the editor, columns, correction notices, and obituaries. Excluded materials include advertisements, indexes to advertisers, tables of contents, information for authors, issue indexes and untitled announcements."

Question 2
How do you select the journals that you abstract and index for your products?

Our product editorial team selects the journals. Librarians and publishers who wish to submit suggestions may send an e-mail to bonnie.hawkwood@thomson.com. The suggestion will be forwarded to the appropriate product editor.

Question 3
How many peer reviewed titles (refereed titles) are in your databases? What do you mean by "refereed?"

Peer reviewed lists can be located on our Titles List site

Thomson Gale identifies the content as "refereed" when the material is of a scholarly or scientific nature and the journal is noted as "refereed" either in its marketing literature, prefatory comments, or a library reference tool, such as a periodicals directory.

Question 4
How often do you update IT Web products?

All products are updated daily, 7 days a week. 

Question 5
Is there a list of journals organized by subject?

Yes. Lists by subject are available on our Titles List site. 

Question 6

Describe your indexing methods.

Subject indexing is done using a controlled vocabulary. Indexers also assign appropriate terms from controlled authority files. The InfoTrac Subject Guide is a patron-friendly snapshot incorporating the InfoTrac subject vocabulary and our many authority files. When entering a topic, a student can access see references, term subdivisions, and related topics from the subject, company, organization, personal name, geographic location, and event authority files. InfoTrac even helps the student with misspellings by displaying near-matches from which a selection can be made. The indexing is found on each record and is hyperlinked as the example below demonstrates:

View other articles linked to these subjects:

Hartford, Connecticut - Social Aspects
View 4 Periodical references
See also 50 other subdivisions
Hispanic Americans - Food and Nutrition
View 35 Periodical references
See also 105 other subdivisions
Hunger - Research
View 22 Periodical references
See also 54 other subdivisions
Nutrition Policy - Social Aspects
View 14 Periodical references
See also 72 other subdivisions

View other articles in this issue
Human Organization, Sep 22, 2000

In addition to subject indexing, Thomson Gale indexers select appropriate terms from the following authority files:

  • Product names
  • Companies
  • Organizations
  • Geographic names
  • Named persons
  • Named works
  • Events

Question 7
Describe the depth of article coverage.

We cite the complete editorial content of every publication, and frequently add enhancements to article titles, in addition to providing indexing. The depth of indexing can vary but, on average, 2 to 6 index terms are added to each indexed article. These will include subject index terms (controlled vocabulary), important named individuals or companies, etc. Certain types of full-text articles are citation-only (such as letters, as per below) without subject index terms added.

Book reviews (plus film reviews, etc.) are subject-indexed under the title of the book and the heading "Books", with sub-heading "reviews". Reviewee and the review's author are also added to the record.

Editorials are subject-indexed and, in certain journals, receive an article type designation "Editorial".

Letters (full-text) are generally citation-only, unless signed by a nationally prominent individual (these are indexed).

Question 8
Tell me about your controlled vocabulary.

Thomson Gale considers its vocabulary a living, dynamic part of its products and supports it within the company with a team of full-time vocabulary experts.  These vocabulary editors continue to add to and modify the vocabulary in response to changing terminology and the emergence of new topics.  Their work is informed by their own research, constant interaction with the indexing staff who are reviewing the current literature, and the input from Thomson Gale's customers.

Vocabulary changes are propagated throughout all retrospective Thomson Gale records so that Thomson Gale's databases reflect a consistent indexing style.

Examples of recent term additions include the following:

  • Bam, Iran, Earthquake, 2003
  • Coppola, Sofia
  • Free Trade Area of the Americas
  • Green design
  • Israeli Security Barrier (Israel and West Bank)
  • Market timing
  • Postwar reconstruction
  • Robotic surgery
  • Skateboard parks
  • Suicide bombings
  • Telephone number portability

Accessibility of various fields/elements through searching

Thomson Gale products provide a large number of access points so that searchers can locate their information in a variety of ways.  The products with a subject guide allow users to search by controlled vocabulary or by keyword.  Controlled elements include:

  • Topics
  • Character names
  • Company names
  • Event names
  • Geographic names
  • Government agencies
  • Organizations
  • Person names
  • Statute names

The keyword search retrieves from all the fields above as well as searching Product Names, Names of Works, Case Names, and words in the title, abstract, or first 50 words of text.  The advanced search function allows specific fields in a search to be combined.

In some products, content-specific information is also searchable, such as:

  • Ticker symbols, SIC codes, and NAICS codes for business products
  • Nationality and gender for biographic and literature products
  • Case and statute citations for law articles.


Question 9

What are title annotations?

Searchability and usability are also improved by the addition of title annotations where the publisher's title is ambiguous, incomplete, or does not give a clear indication of the article's content.  These title annotations, which enhance the keyword search, may spell out acronyms, provide full names of persons or organizations, explain the focus of the article, provide section titles or part numbers, or identify the article as an editorial, review, interview, or some special article type.  

A significant number of Thomson Gale's records include title annotations, such as,

  • Title:  Heavy mettle.  Title annotation (how members of rock group Sevendust stay fit)
  • Title:  NHTSA publishes list of October, November recalls.  Title annotation (National Highway    
    Traffic Safety Administration)(part 1 of 2 lists of automobile recalls)
  • Title:  Boobah.  Title annotation (television program review) 
  • Title: Funky fungi. Title annotation (suits for property damage due to mold in California)
  • Title: Bad days for Blair. Title annotation (British prime minister Tony Blair)
  • Title:  Executive director on SLA's new value statements.  Title annotation (interview with Special Libraries Association director Janice Lachance)

Question 10
How long does it take an article to appear online?

Records are indexed and available for searching within a time frame ranging from one day to two weeks, depending on content type. A queuing methodology is applied to ensure that high-priority titles and news materials are processed in the most timely manner possible.

Question 11
Where can I find titles lists?

Title lists are posted every month by the 15th of the month at www.gale.com/title lists.

Question 12
Please send me a list of everything you have added to your database recently.

Title change lists are posted every month by the 15th of the month at www.gale.com/title lists. These include newly added titles, ceased titles, and title changes. We are now tracking changes in rights on these lists as well.

Question 13
How can I tell when you have lost rights? Will you inform me?

Title change lists are posted every month by the 15th of the month at www.gale.com/titlelists. These include newly added titles, ceased titles, and title changes. We track changes in rights on these lists as well. Customers may subscribe to our Product Bulletin Update e-newsletter and we will send them a reminder of the update each month.